College of Liberal and Fine Arts

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Cindy Ermus, Assistant Professor of History, teaches courses on early modern European history, the Age of Revolutions, and the history of disasters. She specializes in the history of science, medicine, and the environment, especially catastrophe and crisis management, in eighteenth-century France and the Atlantic and Mediterranean Worlds. She is the editor of a volume titled Environmental Disaster in the Gulf South: Two Centuries of Catastrophe, Risk and Resilience (LSU Press, 2018), which was featured in The Atlantic and Al Jazeera's NewsHour.

Her current book project, The Great Plague Scare of 1720: Disaster and Society in the Eighteenth-Century World (under advance contract with Cambridge University Press), is a transnational study of the Plague of Provence of 1720 (the "Great Plague of Marseille"), one of the last outbreaks of plague in Western Europe. By tracing responses to the threat of infection throughout a network of major eighteenth-century port cities, she explores the ways in which the crisis influenced society, politics, and commerce beyond France, in neighboring regions, and in the Atlantic and Pacific colonies.

She also has an interest in the digital humanities, and is co-founder, executive editor, and contributor at www.AgeofRevolutions.com (on Twitter @AgeofRevs).

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James Schneider, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. from St. Lawrence University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Schneider has taught courses in his areas of professional specialization-20th century America and American Foreign Relations-as well as both halves of the introductory Readings courses in US history. Those Readings courses formed part of the foundation of our program until the recent revision in the curriculum. He has also taught the Historical Approaches and Interpretations foundation class. His dissertation on the foreign policy debate in America prior to Pearl Harbor was subsequently published to favorable reviews. Since then he has published a number of short pieces on a variety of topics, while working on a major project concerning inception, development, and demise of the Model Cities program of the Great Society era. That project is nearing completion. Both major research projects have informed his graduate teaching. Until fairly recently, Dr. Schneider was the only specialist on US history after the Progressive Era. The arrival of several additional faculty members with strengths in the 20th century have allowed him to focus more directly on US foreign relations and the wider subject of American interaction with other nations, peoples, and cultures. One of his goals is to incorporate a more comparative perspective into the study of those subjects.

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Crystal Lynn Webster received her PhD from the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of African American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst. She was previously a long-term Mellon dissertation fellow at the Library Company of Philadelphia (2016-17) program in African American history. She has presented at national conferences including the Organization of American Historians and the Association for the Study of African American Life & History, and received first place writing awards from the National Council for Black Studies and the Association of Black Women Historians.

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Catherine Komisaruk’s research focuses on Mexico and Central America, particularly in the colonial era.  Currently she is working on a book about gender, native families, and uprisings in colonial Mexico and Guatemala.  The project is supported in 2018-2019 by a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Her previous book, Labor and Love in Guatemala: The Eve of Independence (Stanford University Press, 2013) is a history of ordinary women and men.  It shows the ways in which modern-day ethnicities and labor forms are rooted in the gendered migration patterns and family configurations of the colonial period.  Komisaruk is also the author of several journal articles and book chapters, and has co-edited the Statistical Abstract of Latin America  and a special issue of the journal Biography.  Her work has been supported by grants from UCLA, the University of Iowa, the American Association of University Women, and the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

Before coming to UTSA, Komisaruk taught at universities in California, New York, and Iowa, and at the secondary level in Guatemala.  Her courses focus on Mexico, Cuba, colonial Latin America, historical research and writing methods, gender and slavery, and native peoples in the Americas. 

She received a bachelor’s degree with high honors from Harvard, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from UCLA.  She has taken courses in modern and classical Nahuatl at the Instituto de Docencia e Investigación Etnológica de Zacatecas in Mexico.

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Omar Valerio-Jiménez, Associate Professor of History, was born in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, and grew up in Taft, Corpus Christi, and Edinburg, Texas. After graduating from MIT, he worked as an engineer for five years before attending UCLA, where he obtained his master’s and doctorate degrees. He has taught courses on borderlands, Latinas/os, immigration, race/ethnicity, and the American West at universities in California, New York, Texas, and Iowa.

His first book, River of Hope: Forging Identity and Nation in the Rio Grande Borderlands (Duke University Press, 2013), explores state formation and cultural change along the Mexico-United States border during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He is a co-editor of Major Problems in Latina/o History (Cengage Learning, 2014), which contains scholarly essays and primary sources on the migration and racialization experiences of various Latino populations. He is also a co-editor of The Latina/o Midwest Reader (University of Illinois Press, 2017) an interdisciplinary anthology that examines the history, education, literature, art, and politics of Latinas/os in the Midwest. His current book project, “Remembering Conquest: Mexican Americans, Memory, and Citizenship,” analyzes the ways in which memories of the U.S.-Mexico War have shaped Mexican Americans’ civil rights struggles, writing, oral discourse, and public rituals. His next project explores the efforts of scholars to challenge the omissions and negative characterizations of Tejanos in the state’s history and in public school textbooks during the mid-twentieth century.

His articles and essays focus on Chicana/o history, gender, comparative racializations, political economy, and Latina/o studies. In addition to publishing articles in the Journal of Women’s History, the Journal of American Ethnic History, Estudios Mexicanos/Mexican Studies, and the Annals of Iowa, he has written anthology chapters on Tejanos in the U.S. Civil War, border corridos, Spanish-Mexican women, U.S.-Mexico borderlands culture, the U.S.-Mexico War, and immigration. His most recent journal article, “Racializing Mexican Immigrants in the Heartland: Iowa’s Early Mexican Communities, 1880-1930,” (in Annals of Iowa) won the 2017 Dorothy Schwieder Prize for Best Article in Midwestern History by the Midwestern History Association and the 2017 Mildred Throne-Charles Aldrich Award for most significant journal article on Iowa history by the State Historical Society of Iowa. His most recent anthology essays are “Contested Citizenship: Border Corridos, Transnational Ties, and Intercultural Conflict” in Border Folk Balladeers: Critical Studies on Américo Paredes and “‘Although We are the Last Soldiers’: Citizenship, Ideology, and Tejano Unionism,” in Lone Star Unionism, Dissent, and Resistance: Other Sides of Civil War Texas.

He serves on the editorial board of Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, Studies in Midwestern History, Journal of Texas Archeology and History, and is a series editor of Latinos in Chicago and the Midwest Series for the University of Illinois Press. In support of his research and writing, he has obtained fellowships from SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, the Western History Association, UCSD’s Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, the Charles Redd Center, the Newberry Library, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Among his university and professional service are promoting the humanities, increasing diversity in the academy, and providing student mentorship. He has been involved in several public humanities projects on Greater Mexico by engaging university students with public history projects on immigration and borderlands history, and participating in workshops for public school teachers. As a former first-generation university student, he is dedicated to mentoring first-generation and underrepresented college students, and to increasing the diversity of university student and faculty populations.

For more information, visit his website

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Andrew Konove received his B.A. in History from Haverford College and his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in History from Yale University, where he also received a Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Latin American Studies. His research focuses on the political, economic, and social history of Mexico in the late colonial and early national periods. His first book, Black Market Capital: Urban Politics and the Shadow Economy of Mexico City (forthcoming from the University of California Press in 2018), traces the history of Mexico City’s infamous thieves market from the seventeenth century to the twentieth. Dr. Konove is currently at work on two new projects: a history of informal currencies in Mexico and Latin America between 1750 and 1850, tentatively titled Making Change: Money, Sovereignty and Development in Latin America, 1750-1850, and a history of Mexico City’s main public square—tentatively titled Zócalo: A History of Mexico City.  In 2015, the article: “On the Cheap: The Baratillo Marketplace and the Shadow Economy of Eighteenth-Century Mexico City” appeared in the journal The Americas. Dr. Konove’s writing has also appeared in the San Antonio Express-News and the foreign policy journal The National Interest

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Dr. Clinton is a pioneering historian of the American South and the Civil War.  She is the author or editor of 25 books, including The Plantation Mistress: Woman’s World in the Old South; The Other Civil War: American Women in the Nineteenth Century; Southern Families at War: Loyalty and Conflict in the Civil War South; and Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom.
Her books Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War and Mrs. Lincoln: A Life are among several that have been History Book Club selections.  Dr. Clinton also has written history books for children, presented at numerous academic conferences, and served as a consultant to Steven Spielberg’s film Lincoln.  In 2015-16, Dr. Clinton will hold the prestigious position of president of the Southern Historical Association.  Dr. Clinton earned her B.A. from Harvard, her M.A. from the University of Sussex, and her Ph.D. from Princeton. She has taught previously at the Citadel, Wesleyan, Brandeis, and she holds a research position at Queens University in Belfast, Northern Ireland, where she taught from 2006-2014.

 

Catherine Clinton's website is: www.catherineclinton.com

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Neel Baumgardner received a B.B.A. and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Texas at Austin and an M.B.A. from Southern Methodist University. Dr. Baumgardner's research focuses on the development and protection of national parks and wilderness areas. His book in progress, titled "Unbordering North America: Creating International Parks along the Periphery of Canada, Mexico, and the United States," examines four different parks in two regions: Waterton Lakes and Glacier in the northern Rocky Mountains of Alberta and Montana, and Big Bend and the Maderas del Carmen in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas and the northern Mexican state of Coahuila. Dr. Baumgardner teaches courses in American Studies and history.

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Felix Almaraz, Professor of History, received a B.A. and an M.A. from St. Mary's University and a Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico. Dr. Almaraz's teaching and research reflects an engagement with processes within Hispanic communities. His main teaching areas include: The Spanish Borderlands, Texas, Colonial Latin America, Imperial and Modern Spain. In recent publications such as Knight Without Armor: Carlos E. Castañeda, A Biography of a Mexican-American Historian, 1896-1958. Texas A&M University Press and Madero in Texas. Corona Publishing Co., 2001, Dr. Almaraz examines the lives and contributions of transnational historical figures. His most recent and significant grants include a 1994 President's Distinguished Achievement Award, an Excellence in Research award in 1988, and a Senior Fulbright Lectureship in the Republic of Argentina.

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Bruce Daniels is a graduate of Syracuse University (A.B.) and the University of Connecticut (M.A., Ph.D.). He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Bihar, India where he worked as an agricultural extension agent. For 31 years, Daniels taught at the University of Winnipeg during which time he received the Clifford Robson Award for Excellence in Teaching and the first annual Erica and Arnold Rogers Award for Excellence in Research.

Daniels is the author of over two hundred scholarly articles and reviews, and ten books, including, The Fragmentation of New England: Economic, Political, and Social Divisions in the Eighteenth Century (1986); Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England (1995 and 2005 editions); Living with Stalin’s Ghost: A Fulbright Memoir of Moscow and the New Russia (2005); and New England Nation: The Country the Puritans Built (2012).

From 1980 to 2004, Daniels held SSHRC research grants. In 1993 he was a Fulbright Fellow and in 2005, he was a Distinguished Fulbright Chair. While working at the University of Winnipeg, Daniels served as Editor of the Canadian Review of American Studies, President of the Canadian Association of American Studies, Associate Editor of American National Biography, Book Review Editor of the Urban History Review, and Contributing Editor of the Journal of American History.
   
Daniels also served as History Department Chair at Texas Tech University, held the Nicolai Sivachev Chair at Moscow State University (Russia), and held the Gilbert N. Denman Endowed Chair in American History at the University of Texas at San Antonio. In addition he has been a visiting professor at Bowling Green State University, Connecticut College for Women, Duke University, The University of Connecticut, and Wilfrid Laurier University.
 
A dual citizen of Canada and the United States, Daniels ran for the Democratic Party’s Presidential nomination in 1996 and served as Lieutenant Governor of the Manitoba Youth Parliament.

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John F. Reynolds, Professor of History, acquired his B.A. and M.A. from Michigan State University and his Ph.D. from Rutgers University. He is a political historian specializing in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in the United States.  He has published two books and several articles addressing the regulation of political parties and the electoral process.  His most recent essay, “The Hustling Candidate and the Advent of the Direct Primary,” appeared in the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (2013).   His research has a social science approach and he has taught graduate courses in quantitative methods in history at UTSA as well as in the University of Michigan’s  InterUniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research summer program.  Reynolds also has had a longstanding interest in the use of multimedia in instruction dating back to his days as an editor of H-Net’s H-MMEDIA.  He continues to experiment with internet based instruction.   Recently he was the principle investigator on a four year grant for developing a hybrid version of the U. S. history survey to be taught partly on-line.  He is also teaches courses in local and public history.  Reynolds’ current research interests have shifted to historical demography where he delves into the baptismal and burial records of San Antonio’s San Fernando parish from 1780 to 1860.

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Catherine Nolan-Ferrell, Associate Professor of History, received an A.B. from Cornell University, an M.A. from Tulane University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Nolan-Ferrell's research interests are in migration, citizenship, and national identity in Modern Mexico and Guatemala, as well as the history of gender in Latin America. Her book, Constructing Citizenship: Transnational Workers and Revolution on the Mexico-Guatemala Border, 1880-1950, (University of Arizona Press, 2012), focuses on how laborers who worked in the coffee industry along the Guatemalan/Mexican border developed an understanding of nationality, particularly after the implementation of agrarian reforms in the late 1930s.

Her current work examines the movement of Guatemalan campesinos into southern Mexico and the U.S., both as economic migrants and as refugees. In the 1950s, Central Americans, particularly Guatemalans, migrated to Mexico in search of better economic opportunities. With the expansion of the Guatemalan civil war (1960-1996), however, thousands of indigenous villagers escaped the violence by becoming refugees in southern Mexico. Families became divided by those who maintained a “Guatemalan”/ indigenous identity, and those who “Mexicanized.” Children, either those who fled with their families or who were born in refugee camps, often sought to move further north, to the U.S., for both security and economic opportunity. Dr. Nolan-Ferrell has been doing archival and oral history field work with these border communities since the summer of 2013.

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Wing Chung Ng teaches Chinese, Japanese, and East Asian history. His research interest covers two major areas. Chinese migration and diaspora is his “first love” cultivated since he was in graduate school.  Ng’s more recent research pertains to the subject of Cantonese opera, a genre of regional theater widely popular in South China and among Cantonese migrant communities overseas since the early twentieth century. His principal publications include The Chinese in Vancouver, 1945-80: The Pursuit of Identity and Power (Vancouver: UBC Press, 1999) and The Rise of Cantonese Opera (Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press and Hong Kong: HKU Press, 2015). Since 2012, Ng has been working with three fellow editors to complete the Hong Kong volumes of Annals of Chinese Opera (中國戲曲志:香港卷) and Anthology of Chinese Opera Music (中國戲曲音樂集成:香港卷). Ng’s other current projects include: 1. Local theater and cultural politics in Guangzhou and the vicinity during the early PRC period (1949-1965); 2. Cantonese opera in Hong Kong since 1945, especially its re-imagination as a cultural heritage and a subject of academic research in the late colonial and postcolonial years; 3. Diaspora in the Ages of China’s Rise: A longitudinal study of Chinese migration history since the eighteenth century. Ng has received accolades from many sources. He was a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of British Columbia and a resident fellow at the National Humanities Center, N.C. His research on Cantonese opera was supported by the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Most recently, he was a Fulbright Scholar in Hong Kong.

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Gregg L. Michel, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. from the University of Chicago and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Dr. Michel's scholarly work focuses on movements for social change in post-World War II America, particularly in the 1960s South. He has published several articles and delivered numerous papers on this topic. His book, Struggle for a Better South: The Southern Student Organizing Committee, 1964-1969, examines the turbulent history of the bending progressive white student organizations in the 1960s South. His expertise in such content areas as the history of the civil rights movement and post-World War II southern and African-American history have helped to expand the graduate program, and the diverse methodologies he employs in his research allows him to expose his students to a wide range of historical approaches, including the use of oral testimony to access the attitudes and beliefs of ordinary people in the past. Dr. Michel has taught Historical Methods, a course which is required of all graduate students. The course seeks to introduce students to the historian's craft through an examination of a variety of historical methodologies and a focus on basic writing and analytical skills. As the course title suggests, the class is not organized around a particular topic or time period but rather the methods historians use to make sense of the past. As a foundational course for graduate students, he seeks to expose students to numerous approaches to researching and understanding the past.

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Patrick J. Kelly, Associate Professor of History, the University of Texas at San Antonio. 

I grew up in Austin, and graduated with a B.A. in History from U.T.-Austin. In 1992 I received my Ph.D. from New York University, under the direction of Thomas Bender. Before coming to UTSA in 1997, I served as Lecturer in Social Studies at Harvard College and as a Visiting Professor of History at Tufts University. At Harvard I was awarded an award for excellence in teaching.  My first book, Creating a National Home: Building the Veterans' Welfare State, 1860-1900 (Harvard University Press, 1998), focuses on the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, the direct bureaucratic precursor to today’s Veterans Health Administration. My article, "The Election of 1896 and the Restructuring Civil War Memory," (Civil War History, September 2003), examines the Republican Party's deployment of Civil War memory in its effort to defeat William Jennings Bryan. My research now focuses on the interconnections between the Civil War and the French intervention into Mexico.  My article, “The North American Crisis of the 1860s,”(Journal of the Civil War Era, September 2012) argues that the U.S. Civil War and French intervention should be framed in a continental perspective.  My article, "The European Revolutions of 1848 and the Transnational Turn in Civil War History" (Journal of the Civil War Era, September 2014) examines recent histories that embed the Civil War within global history.  My essay, "The Cat's Paw, Confederate Ambitions in Latin America," appears in American Civil Wars: The United States, Latin America, Europe and the Crisis of the 1860s (UNC Press, 2017).  This article argues that the slave South was lost its capacity to expand territorially in the Western Hemisphere once it left the Union.   My essay, "The Lost Continent of Abraham Lincoln" (The Journal of the Civil War Era, June 2019), argues that Abraham Lincoln was thinking of the Civil War hemispherically when he utilized the ideologically loaded word "continent: in the first line of the Gettysburg Address.  With Rhonda Minten, I  edited a collection of primary documents, Living on the Edge:  Texas During the Civil War and Reconstruction(Cognellla Press, 2015). My book, The Lost Continent of Abraham Lincoln (LSU, forthcoming) examines republicanism in the New World during the crisis of the 1860s.  I have received a Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, an “Extending the Reach” fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and two Faculty Development Leaves from the University of Texas at San Antonio. 

 

I teach courses (both undergraduate and graduate) on the Civil War and World War II, the introductory graduate Theories and Methods class, and the Proseminar-Seminar capstone M.A. course. He also teaches both halves of the undergraduate U.S. survey, Texas History, Historical Methods, the Senior Seminar in History.

Recent Publications

The Lost Continent of Abraham Lincoln  Published in The Journal of the Civil War Era in June 2019

The European Revolutions of 1848 and the Transnational Turn in Civil War History Published in The Journal of the Civil War Era in September 2014.

Let Us Hail Gettysburg- and Puebla.  Published in the San Antonio Express-News in July 2013.

The North American Crisis of the 1860s.  Published in The Journal of the Civil War Era in September 2012.

The Election of 1869 and the Restructuring of Civil War Memory.  Published in Civil War History in September 2003.

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Anne Hardgrove, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. from Carleton College and Ph.D. in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Hardgrove's focus is interdisciplinary, with a geographical concentration on South Asia, in particular India. Her dissertation sought to address the question of how people begin to think of themselves as larger regional and pan-regional communities. This project was awarded the American Historical Association Gutenberg-e Prize for Outstanding Dissertation in History. In 2002, she published an electronic book with Columbia University Press, which is based upon her dissertation and further research. The title of this monograph is: Community and Public Culture: The Marwaris in Calcutta c. 1897 - 1997. Her current research, entitled "The Global Erotic: Translating the Kamasutra" seeks to address issues about the global construction of sexuality, in light of the transnational circulation and flow of erotic texts and ideas. She situates sexuality along the lines of colonialism, gender, class, and cross-cultural exchange. Her project also attempts to bridge the divide usually imposed between colony and metropole, and considers American appropriations of sexual ideas from other cultures. Specifically, she seeks to make bridges between Indian and U.S. histories. Dr. Hardgrove's teaching responsibilities -- which include teaching two undergraduate courses in world history -- have helped her to develop her expertise in that area, and she has been able to incorporate significant global and comparative perspectives into her graduate teaching.

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Gabriela Gonzalez is an Associate Professor of History.  She received her Ph.D. in History from Stanford University in 2005.  Her research centers on transborder political and social activists in South Texas from 1900 to 1960.  Dr. Gonzalez's book under contract with Oxford University Press is titled Redeeming La Raza:  Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability, and Rights.  Also forthcoming is a book chapter on the transnational advocacy of journalist Jovita Idar to appear in the upcoming edited volume, Texas Women/American Women:  Their Lives and Times (University of Georgia Press, 2014).  Dr. Gonzalez has started work on her second book project, a political biography of the Idar family.  She has published some of her work on transborder activism and the politics of race, class, and gender in various encyclopedic articles as well as a full-length 2003 article appearing in Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s History focused on Carolina Munguía and Emma Tenayuca.  The University of Nebraska Press reprinted this article in 2007.  Both the article and its reprint were part of the Gender in the Borderlands Conference proceedings, edited by Antonia I. Castañeda and Sue Armitage.

Dr. Gonzalez teaches U.S. history, the history of the U.S.-Mexican borderlands, Latina/o history, women’s history, and Historical Methods.  She was selected as an awardee of the Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowship for 2007-2008.  In 2012-2013, she served as the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures Visiting Scholar.  In this capacity she organized The UTSA-ITC Civil and Human Rights in Texas Series involving undergraduate student activists, graduate student researchers, community activists, established scholars and public intellectuals who came together to examine the meanings, implications, and promise of struggles for rights across the axes of difference as experienced today and in previous eras.

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Rhonda M. Gonzales is Professor of African and African Diaspora History. Associate Vice Provost for Strategic Initiatives, and Director of PIVOT for Academic Success at The University of Texas at San Antonio. Gonzales is an American Council on Education Fellow. The National Endowment for the Humanities, Andrew Mellon Foundation, Ford Foundation, and The American Historical Association have supported her research on the history of women and their roles in sustaining and transforming communities through religion, medicine and economy in precolonial Africa and in the African Diaspora in Mexico.  Her publications include Bantu Africa, 3500 BCE to Present, Societies, Religion, and History: Central East Tanzanians and the World They Created, c. 200 BCE to 1800 CE, “No Friends in the Holy Office: Black and Mulata Women Healing Communities and Answering to the Inquisition in Seventeenth Century Mexico,” among others. This May and June, she spent seven weeks doing NEH-supported field research in Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. As a first-generation college graduate, she is passionate about envisioning and implementing programming and best practices to support the success of under-represented minorities, first-generation, transition, low SES, and STEM students through to graduation. She is the recipient of a $3.25 million Department of Education Title-V Grant that has initiated four student success programs at The University of Texas at San Antonio: First to Go and Graduate, the Roadrunner Transition Experience, Alamo Runners, and Math Matters, as well as $3.6 million to build out an Emporium delivered core math and the development of a LEAD I and II summer bridge experiences for UTSA freshmen and sophomores.     

 

Rhonda M. Gonzales is from Long Beach, California. She holds a BA in Sociology and an MA and PhD in History from UCLA. 

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Kirsten E. Gardner, Associate Professor of History, teaches in the Department of History, Program of Women’s Studies, and American Studies Program.  In 2015, she was honored with the UT System Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award.  She is also a member of the UTSA Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars and a winner of the President’s Distinguished Teaching Award for Core Curriculum.  Dr. Gardner has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in U.S. History, Women and Gender Studies, History of Medicine, Modern U.S. history, Gender and Technology, Research and Writing Practices, and Pedagogy for Historical Thinking.

Dr. Gardner earned a B.A. from Georgetown University; M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati; and a graduate certificate in Women’s Studies from University of Cincinnati.  Her research focuses on issues of women's health, technology and healthcare, and women and the military.  Early Detection Women, Cancer, and Awareness Campaigns in the Twentieth-Century United States (UNC, 2006) traced women’ s activism and cancer early detections campaigns for nearly a century.  More recently, her work on the history of diabetes since insulin explores how medical technologies and patient experience have intersected in the past century.  Gardner has published her research and reviews in several book chapters and many academic journals including The Journal of Women's History; Enterprise and Society; Literature and Medicine; Gender, Health and Popular Culture: Historical Perspectives; Beauty and Business: Commerce, Gender, and Culture in Modern America; and Artificial Parts and Practical Lives: Modern History of Prosthetics.

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Brian Davies, Professor of History, received a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from The University of Chicago. Dr. Davies specializes in Russian History. He has additional research interests in early modern European, Ottoman, and Central Asian history and is especially interested in the comparative study of state building in the early modern era, subaltern social history, and the development of the capitalist world-system. He has published three monographs-- State Power and Community in Early Modern Russia (London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2004); Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500-1700 (Routledge, 2007); Empire and Military Revolution in Eastern Europe (Continuum, 2011)—an edited volume, Warfare in Eastern Europe, 1500-1800 (Brill, 2011), and contributed two chapters to The Cambridge History of Russia. Volume One: From Early Rus' to 1689 (Cambridge University Press, 2006). He is at work on another book. Dr. Davies has developed several graduate level courses addressing transnational issues, among them HIS 5013: Readings in Modern European History; HIS 5063: Readings in Early Modern European History; HIS 6483 Topics in Comparative History: Empire; and HIS 6813/ 6903 Proseminar/Seminar Sequence: The Making of the Modern Capitalist World-System. Davies is also available for Independent Study on topics in the political and social history of Russia and Eastern Europe, early modern Western Europe, Dar al-Islam, Central Asia, military history, and comparative studies.

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Steven R. Boyd, Professor of History, received a B.A. from Claremont McKenna College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Boyd teaches courses in the American Revolution and the Law and American Society. These courses provide students with a basis for subsequent comparative work on revolutions, law, and social development in Latin America, Europe, and Asia. His early research, which examined the contract clause of the Constitution and the Whiskey Rebellion, addressed the question of why by 1789 the Constitution had been accepted as the basis for governance within the United States. In Alternative Constitutions for the United States, Dr. Boyd expanded the temporal focus of his interest in the durability of the Constitution against all challengers. His more recent work focuses on the place of the Constitution in American culture more broadly by examining the perceptions of the Constitution in American utopian novels in the late nineteenth century and by studying attitudes and ideas about the Constitution as expressed on Civil War Patriotic Envelopes at the outset of the Civil War. That latter focus is part of a larger book length study of popular attitudes in the North and South about the Constitution, the rule of law, and why men and women in both regions fought and supported their respective governments.

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